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Should midwives measure blood loss in the fourth stage of labour?

The fourth stage of labour is defined in some research as the first 1 to 2 hours following delivery of the placenta (Kashanian et al, 2010; Gungorduk et al, 2011) However, in undertaking a literature...

Induction of labour for post-term pregnancy

Recent decades have seen a theoretical power shift from clinician authority to user autonomy alongside a public and political movement emphasising personal choice and control in relation to maternity...

Facilitating antenatal education classes in Scotland

Provision of antenatal education by registered midwives is advocated by the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) (NMC, 2012) as a means of preparation for parenthood and is identified by government...

Using feminist phenomenology to explore women's experiences of domestic violence in pregnancy

Domestic violence and abuse against women is a global public health issue (World Health Organisation (WHO), 2010) It has a long history, exists in many cultures, and is accepted as part of everyday...

The value of preceptorship for newly qualified midwives

Preceptorship in midwifery is a term used to describe a period of support given to newly qualified midwives to enable them to develop their knowledge and skills within their new working environment...

Listening in: A survey of supervisors of midwives in London

The fundamental purpose of the statutory supervision of midwives has always been to protect the public This is achieved in myriad of ways including; interfacing with an organisation's clinical...

Stillbirth: A reflective case study

This reflective paper seeks to explore some of the issues surrounding bereavement care and the importance of sensitive and individualised care when dealing with bereaved parents Reflection is a key...

Midwifery Practice: Critical Illness, Complications and Emergencies Case Book

As technology and innovation drive health and maternity care into the future, more women with complicated and specific health care needs are conceiving and giving birth. With this in mind, this book...

Writing Your Journal Article in 12 weeks: A Guide to Academic Publishing Success

Consider the scene: You have finished your research report/MSc dissertation/PhD and your manager/supervisor/employer asks ‘have you published?’ What do you do? Where do you start? How do you condense...

Opioid prescription increase in pregnancy

US The number of pregnant women being prescribed opioids for pain relief has been steadily rising Now more than 14% of women in the US are taking this kind of medication during pregnancy This has...

Never mind the World Cup—Brazil in the obstetric spotlight

With a shrinking world and a mobile healthcare workforce, it is important for midwives to be aware of what happens elsewhere. In June 2014, the International Congress of Midwives (ICM) holds its 30th...

Can I wear my heart on my sleeve?

I had anticipated that I would cry when I witnessed my first birth. But I did not, my reaction was rather reserved. In fact, I felt more emotional watching ‘One born every minute’.

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