Research

Routine screening of women having caesarean section for MRSA: Ritual or rational?

Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (also known as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA) is a growing problem throughout the world, and although originally associated with...

Attitudes to immunisation in pregnancy among women in the UK targeted by such programmes

The ability to safely and effectively vaccinate in pregnancy offers important protection to both pregnant women and their babies in utero and from birth against potentially serious infectious diseases...

A national online survey of UK maternity unit service provision for women with fear of birth

There is no agreed definition on what fear of birth (FoB) is, largely due to the differences in its diagnostic testing (Haines et al, 2011) However, Areskog (1982: 263) defined severe FoB in women who...

Healing identity by telling childbirth stories on the internet

Childbirth is challenging and while there is a reliance on experts such as midwives and doctors to provide education in the rules for birth (Cheyney, 2011), informal sources of information regarding...

Pregnant women's reactions to routine CO monitoring in the antenatal clinic

Carbon monoxide (CO), a colourless, odourless and poisonous gas, is a waste product of cigarette smoking CO monitoring is an immediate and non-invasive method of determining smoking status (National...

Female pelvic shape: Distinct types or nebulous cloud?

For well over 50 years, students of midwifery, obstetrics, gynaecology and related professions have been taught the Caldwell-Moloy classification of the female pelvis While recognising variation and...

Creating a culture of ‘safe normality’: Developing a new inner city alongside midwifery unit

In the UK, the majority of maternity care is provided through obstetric units (OUs) (accounting for approximately 93% of births)

Do midwives see caesarean section wound care education as a need?

Despite recommendations from the World Health Organization (WHO) that the ideal rate for caesarean sections (CS) should be between 10 and 15%, the CS rate in the UK has not reduced in recent years and...

Does the timing of deinfibulation for women with type 3 female genital mutilation affect labour outcomes?

Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a deeply-rooted practice, with culture and tradition given as the main reasons for its continuation (Momoh, 2003) FGM affects approximately 140 million women...

Promoting homebirth: Intermediate homebirth report

The drive for Birmingham Women's hospital to relook at its current service provision and improve choice around place of birth was in direct response to the findings in the Birthplace Study (Birthplace...

Antenatal alcohol exposure: An East Anglian study of midwives' knowledge and practice

In 1968, the French doctor Lemoine and his colleagues first described a pattern of physical and neurodevelopmental abnormalities observed among children of mothers with alcohol problems (Lemoine et...

Italian fathers' experiences of labour pain

In 1996, a document titled ‘Care in normal birth’ was published by the World Health Organization (WHO) with the purpose of spreading a culture of normal birth with the least interventions possible...

Midwives' perception about their practice in a midwifery-led care model in karachi, Pakistan

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) 2010 statistics, every day about 1000 women die during childbirth Of these deaths, 99% occur in developing countries (WHO, 2014) The global neonatal...

Barriers preventing Australian midwives from providing antenatal asthma management

Asthma is one of the most common potentially serious conditions that complicates pregnancy, with approximately 3–14% of pregnant women affected by asthma worldwide; 127% of pregnant women in Australia...

Alcohol consumption in pregnancy and its implications for breastfeeding

Lifestyle choices before and during pregnancy can have a significant impact on the health and wellbeing of both a woman and her unborn child (O'Keeffe et al, 2013) Women are often advised by health...

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