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Breastfeeding

‘You're kinda passing a test’: A phenomenological study of women's experiences of breastfeeding

Despite an increasing research base about what helps or hinders breastfeeding, there is a dramatic drop in breastfeeding prevalence within the first 6 weeks (Health and Social Care Information Centre,...

What influences women to stop or continue breastfeeding? A thematic analysis

Breastfeeding is a natural form of infant feeding, but not all women breastfeed, and those who do may not necessarily feed for the recommended length of time (Feenstra et al, 2018) It is advised that...

Maternal attitude towards breastfeeding: A concept analysis

This article explores and clarifies the concept of maternal attitude as related to breastfeeding by exploring the literature and undertaking a concept analysis using Walker and Avant's (2011)...

Does frenotomy improve breastfeeding problems in neonates with ankyloglossia?

Breastfeeding is the natural way of providing neonates with all the nutrients they need for growth and development; with exclusive breastfeeding recommended for the first 6 months of life (World...

Using the Solihull Approach in breastfeeding support groups: Maternal perceptions

Breastfeeding is a public health priority in the UK (Public Health England, 2016) While the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends using peer support to increase both initiation and duration of...

Exploring breastfeeding peer supporters' experiences of using the Solihull Approach model

Peer support for breastfeeding mothers is defined by The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) as:

Tongue-tie and breastfeeding: Identifying problems in the diagnostic and treatment journey

Tongue-tie (ankyloglossia) is a common condition with a prevalence between 02 and 107% (Segal et al, 2007; Francis et al, 2015; Power and Murphy, 2015), and is defined as an embryological remnant of...

Fathers and breastfeeding: Attitudes, involvement and support

A plethora of literature has examined the factors behind low breastfeeding rates and has indicated that a mother's decision to breastfeed is associated with social, cultural, personal and...

What influences women to bottle-feed from birth and to discontinue breastfeeding early?

Breastmilk has been widely advocated as the optimal nutrition for newborn babies and infants In both developing and developed countries, extensive research has produced evidence to sustain claims that...

Labour and beyond: The roles of synthetic and endogenous oxytocin in transition to motherhood

In the course of spontaneous physiological labour, endogenous oxytocin is released from the pituitary gland and initiates uterine contractions However, when it is deemed medically necessary to induce...

Relationship between social support and breastfeeding self-efficacy among women in Tabriz, Iran

Breast milk not only protects the baby from infections and diseases, but it is also thought to predispose a person to good health over his/her lifetime (Varaei et al, 2009) There is a wealth of...

Tongue-tie division. Is it worth it? A retrospective cohort study

Ankyloglossia, or tongue tie, is a congenital abnormality characterised by a short frenulum, which may restrict tongue motility It is usually asymptomatic, but in some cases may cause problems during...

Midwives' experiences of helping women struggling to breastfeed

Breastfeeding is accepted as the optimum way to nourish babies (World Health Organization (WHO), 2016), with proven health benefits for both babies and mothers (Renfrew et al, 2012; Victora et al,...

Skin-to-skin contact after elective caesarean section: Investigating the effect on breastfeeding rates

Numerous policy documents from the Department of Health (2009a; 2009b; 2011; 2012a; 2012b; 2013) recognise that breastfeeding is associated with overwhelming health benefits and large potential cost...

Is frenotomy effective in improving breastfeeding in newborn babies with tongue-tie? A literature review

With the increasingly persuasive evidence that breastfeeding provides infants and mothers with significant health benefits (Oddy et al, 1999; Kull et al, 2002; UNICEF, 2010), midwives and other health...

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