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Ellen Kitson-Reynolds

Post-doctoral clinical academic midwife, University of Southampton

Changing the tide: influencing factors for midwives on vaginal breech birth skill acquisition

An exploratory qualitative design was chosen to articulate an understanding of the experiences of midwives influencing skill acquisition. An exploratory methodology was chosen to gain a better...

Fairy tale midwifery ten years on: facilitating the transition to newly qualified midwife

Seminal work (Kramer, 1974) indicated that newly qualified practitioners experience a reality shock on initiation of first post, which is supported by subsequent literature (Maben and Macleod-Clark,...

Fairy tale midwifery 10 years on: re-evaluating the lived experiences of newly qualified midwives

At the point of registration, the newly qualified midwife (NQM) is a competent novice practitioner in low-risk midwifery care, and is expected to refine and develop skills and confidence in caring for...

Lack of care? Women's experiences of maternity bladder management

Although a healthy urinary system is an essential aspect of every woman's life, health professionals often neglect bladder management during pregnancy, labour, and puerperium (Carr and Cook, 2009) The...

Living with autism: What's your superpower? A personal reflection

This article provides an overview of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) incorporating the carer and user perspectives linked to maternity services, based on the author's personal experience It discusses...

Transition to midwifery: Collaborative working between university and maternity services

The first few months’ experiences of a newly qualified midwife's first post have an impact on the individual's confidence and the overall quality of the maternity service offered to the women and...

Fairy tale midwifery—fact or fiction: The lived experiences of newly qualified midwives

Newly qualified midwives are expected to function as autonomous practitioners (Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC), 2004) from their date of registration, yet it was apparent locally that there was...

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