Clinical Practice

Skin-to-skin contact following caesarean section: a narrative review

Skin-to-skin contact (SSC), the deliberate placement of an infant on the bare chest of its mother, is commonly performed after normal vaginal delivery because of its numerous benefits (Moore et al,...

A service evaluation of a hospital-based specialist postnatal breastfeeding clinic

Breastfeeding is described as the gold standard of infant feeding and is beneficial to both infant and maternal health Breastfeeding protects infants against diarrhoea and respiratory infections,...

The Acton Model: support for women with female genital mutilation

Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a global healthcare problem affecting an estimated 200 million women and girls, worldwide (World Health Organization [WHO], 2016) It is defined as ‘all procedures...

Diagnosis of perineal trauma: getting it right first time

It is estimated that 85% of women will sustain some degree of perineal trauma during vaginal delivery and 60–70% of these will require suturing (Kettle and Tohill, 2008) Perineal trauma includes not...

COVID-19 and the risk to black, Asian and minority ethnic women during pregnancy

Recently, concerns have been raised about a possible association between ethnicity and incidence and outcomes of COVID-19, following observational data released from the Intensive Care National Audit...

Tales of two midwives: medical conditions of pregnancy that changed our midwifery practice

The outbreak of COVID-19 has meant that midwifery around the world is currently set against an ever-present backdrop of disease Although pregnancy and childbirth are most often a healthy and normal...

Supporting vegans through pregnancy and lactation

The number of British people who identify as vegan has quadrupled in the last five years (The Vegan Society, 2019) Indications are that nearly half of the vegans in the UK made the change in 2018...

Latch-related nipple pain in breastfeeding women: the impact on breastfeeding outcomes

Breastfeeding rates in the UK remain some of the lowest in the world The World Health Organization (2020) recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of an infant's life, followed by...

The Poole approach to a smoke-free pregnancy

Targeted and personal support for pregnant women to stop smoking as early as possible in pregnancy is an important intervention to optimise the health of both unborn babies and their mothers, and for...

Importance of vitamin D during the antenatal period for maternal well-being

The best source of vitamin D is exposure to natural sunlight and 90% of vitamin D is derived from sunlight with 10% derived from food and plant sources (Paxton et al, 2013; Cannell, 2019)...

Nappy rash: current evidence for the prevention and management

Nappy rash, also known as diaper rash, nappy dermatitis, diaper dermatitis or irritant diaper dermatitis, is one of the most common skin conditions found in infants and is an acute inflammatory...

Reducing the incidence of stillbirth in black women

A stillbirth is a baby delivered at or after 24 weeks of pregnancy showing no signs of life, irrespective of when the death occurred The UK is noted to have one of the highest stillbirth rates in...

Revised standards of proficiencies for midwives: an opportunity to influence childhood health?

The first 1 000 days of life, from conception until a child's second birthday, are significant in terms of influencing childhood health (Black et al, 2016; Cusick and Georgieff, 2018; House of Commons...

Understanding the vulnerability of a baby's skin to help treat and prevent nappy rash

The first breath taken within seconds of birth is a vital role allowing the lungs to fill with air (Kenner and Lott, 2014)—signifying the moment the baby is now living in a gaseous (air) environment...

Congenital heart disease: issues with screening at the newborn physical examination

Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a significant cause of infant death and accounts for between 3-75% of deaths in infancy in the developed world (Singh et al, 2014) For this reason, screening for CHD...

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