References

Jamieson DJ, Steinberg JP, Martinello RA, Perl T, Rasmussen S. Obstetricians on the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) front lines and the confusing world of personal protective equipment. Obsterics and Gynecology. 2020; 00:1-7 https://doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000003919

Joob B, Wiwanitkit V. Traumatization in medical staff helping with COVID-19 control. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity. 2020; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2020.03.020

Lu W, Wang H, Lin Y. Psychological status of medical workforce during the COVID-19 pandemic: A cross-sectional study. Psychiatry Research. 2020; 288 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2020.112936

Panahi L, Amir M, Pouy S. Risks of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in pregnancy: a narrative review. Archives of Academic Emergency Medicine. 2020; 8:(1)

Rasmussen SA, Jamieson DJ. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and pregnancy: responding to a rapidly evolving situation. Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2020; 135:(5)999-1002 https://doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000003873

Rimmer A. Covid-19: doctors in final trimester of pregnancy should avoid direct patient contact. British Medical Journal. 2020a; 368 https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m1173

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COVID-19: what are the physical and mental challenges?

02 June 2020
3 min read
Volume 28 · Issue 6
 A recent study review has revealed that COVID-19 does not infect newborns and that symptoms of the disease appear to be the same in both pregnant and non-pregnant women
A recent study review has revealed that COVID-19 does not infect newborns and that symptoms of the disease appear to be the same in both pregnant and non-pregnant women

Abstract

George F Winter gives an overview of the impact of the coronavirus on healthcare workers and pregnant women

The global emergence of COVID-19 a matter of months ago means that while its relatively thin evidence base expands, the need to interpret new findings with caution implies that the science of this agent remains unsettled.

Accepting this caveat, some midwifery related aspects of COVID-19 can be considered. Thus, in their narrative review of 13 studies of COVID-19 risks in pregnancy, Panahi et al (2020) report that the agent can cause fetal distress, miscarriage, respiratory distress and preterm delivery in pregnant women but does not infect newborns, and that the clinical symptoms of COVID-19 are the same in pregnant and non-pregnant women. But although Panahi et al (2020) note that vertical transmission in pregnancy has not been demonstrated, Rasmussen and Jamieson (2020) state that the effects of COVID-19 in early pregnancy are unknown and that no neonates had (at the time of writing) been delivered to women infected in the first and second trimesters of pregnancy.

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