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Obesity in pregnancy

02 June 2020
2 min read
Volume 28 · Issue 6

Abstract

Obesity is a problem faced worldwide, causing numerous health conditions for both men and women. Sydney Kerelo takes a closer look at how it can affect pregnancy

As the world changes, new pandemics come to light, stress increases, anxiety skyrockets, and in order to combat all of that fear, many develop certain ways to cope. Some take exercise, some find creative outlets such as painting or writing, while others choose to indulge in food. Copious amounts of eating has become a coping mechanism for thousands across the globe as well as seen as a form of enjoyment. Extensive eating is easy to do, with various restaurants and fast food places at quick disposal, it can become an easy habit to develop, especially for pregnant woman.

When pregnant, constant food cravings and eating can quickly become easy to get consumed in and thus become overweight. According to Catalano et al (2017), the World Health Organization states over 50% of men and women in Europe are considered obese, 23% of women being obese. Poston et al discuss the prevalence of obesity in women in England, where it is amongst the highest in Europe with 1 in 5 women of reproductive age are now obese (Poston et al, 2011).

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