References

Burns I, Paterson IM Clinical practice and placement support: supporting learning in practice. Nurse Educ Pract. 2005; 5:(1)3-9 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nepr.2004.02.001

Byrom S, Edwards G, Garrod D Consultant midwives - 10 years on!. MIDIRS. 2009; 19:(1)23-5

Coster S, Redfern S, Wilson-Barnett J, Evans A, Peccei R, Guest D Impact of the role of nurse, midwife and health visitor consultant. J Adv Nurs. 2006; 55:(3)352-63

HSC 1999/217: Nurse, midwife and health visitor consultants: establishing posts and making appointments.London: DH; 1999

Redfern S, Guest D, Wilson-Barnett J, Pecce R, Rosenthal P, Dewe P, Evans A Role innovations in the NHS. In: Dopson S, Mark AL (eds.). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan; 2003

London: RCOG Press; 2007

Clinicians in the classroom: The consultant midwife

02 April 2016
4 min read
Volume 24 · Issue 4

Abstract

This is the third in a series of articles exploring expert clinicians' participation in teaching pre-registration midwifery students in the classroom setting. This article considers sessions facilitated by a consultant midwife. The role of consultant midwife was first introduced in the UK in 2000 as a senior position within maternity services to provide professional leadership and a senior level of clinical midwifery expertise. A key element of the role of the consultant midwife is education, training and development (Department of Health, 1999). A consultant midwife from Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust discusses her experience teaching pre-registration midwifery students. Feedback from students indicates that they value the input of expert clinicians into pre-registration midwifery education.

Safer Childbirth: Minimum Standards for the Organisation and Delivery of Care in Labour (Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists et al, 2007) recommended the recruitment of at least one consultant midwife per 900 births in order to provide adequate clinical leadership. However, despite this recommendation, in many individual organisations the numbers of consultant midwives remain small.

The role of consultant midwife was first introduced in the UK in 2000 (Byrom et al, 2009) with post-holders attaining key senior positions within maternity services to provide professional leadership and a senior level of clinical midwifery expertise (Coster et al, 2006). A key element of the role is education, training and development (Department of Health, 1999). Historically, the main focus of the consultant midwife tended to be either normality or public health, but more recently other areas of expertise have begun to emerge, for example, high-risk care. The role is diverse and highly collaborative, with consultant midwives linking with multidisciplinary colleagues in their own Trusts and externally with peers across the UK.

Register now to continue reading

Thank you for visiting British Journal of Midwifery and reading some of our peer-reviewed resources for midwives. To read more, please register today. You’ll enjoy the following great benefits:

What's included

  • Limited access to our clinical or professional articles

  • New content and clinical newsletter updates each month