References

Abubakar A, Sambo MN, Idris SH. Awareness and utilization of antenatal care services delivery in a rural community. Northwestern, Nigeria. Kanem Journal of Medical Sciences. 2011; 5:(2)43-49

Adewoye KR, Musa IO, Atoyebi OA, Babatunde OA. Knowledge and utilization of antenatal care services by women of child bearing age in Ilorin-East local government area, North Central Nigeria. International Journal of Science and Technology. 2013; 3:(3)22-33

Albertina M, Sipasulta C, Nurhayati E. Social support in the utilization of antenatal care services based on customer driven. International Refereed Journal of Engineering and Science. 2015; 4:(6)18-22

Aniebue UU, Aniebue PN. Women's perception as a barrier to focused antenatal care in Nigeria: the issue of fewer antenatal visits. Health Policy Plan. 2011; 26:423-428 https://doi.org/10.1093/heapol/czq073

Butawa NN, Babayo T, Idris H, Adiri F, Taylor K. Knowledge and perceptions of maternal health in Kaduna State, Northern Nigeria. African Journal of Reproductive Health. 2010; 14:71-76

Bazant ES, Koenig MA. Women's satisfaction with delivery care in Nairobi's informal settlements. International Journal for Quality in Health Care. 2009; 21:79-86 https://doi.org/10.1093/intqhc/mzn058

Citong E. Determinants of focused antenatal care uptake among women in Tharaka Nithi Country, Kenya. Advances in Public Health. 2017; https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3685401

Cham M, Sundby J, Vangen S. Availability and quality of emergency obstetric care in Gambia's main referral hospital: women-users' testimonies. Reproductive Health. 2009; 6:5-22 https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-4755-6-5

Dairo MD, Owoyokun KE. Factors affecting the utilization of antenatal care services in Ibadan, Nigeria. Benin Journal of Postgraduate Medicine. 2010; 12:(1)5-7 https://doi.org/10.4314/bjpm.v12i1.63387

Dzomeku MV. Maternal satisfaction with care during labour: a case study of the Mampong-Ashanti district hospital maternity unit in Ghana. International Journal of Nursing and Midwifery. 2011; 3:(3)30-34

Fagbamigbe AF, Idemudia ES. Barrier to antenatal care use in Nigeria: evidences from non-users and implications for maternal health programming. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth. 2015; 10:(1)15-27 https://doi.org/10.1186/s12884-015-0527-y

Nigeria integrated supportive supervision survey, 3rd edn. : Federal Government; 2011

Galle A, Parys V, Roelens K, Keygnaert I. Expectations and satisfaction with antenatal care among pregnant women with a focus on vulnerable groups: a descriptive study in Ghent. BMC Women's Health. 2015; 15 https://doi.org/10.1186/s12905-015-0266-2

Health Services Commission. 2016. https://hsc.lagosstate.gov.ng/ (accessed22 March 2020)

Jallow IK, Chow YJ, Liu TL, Huang N. Women's perception of antenatal care services in public and private clinics in the Gambia. Int J Qual Health Care. 2012; 24:595-600 https://doi.org/10.1093/intqhc/mzs033

Khanam N, Syed ZQ, Wagh V. Patient satisfaction on maternal and child health services. Indian Medical Gazette. 2012; 1:(1)47-51

Matejic B, Milicevic MS, Vasic V, Djikanovic B. Maternal satisfaction with organized perinatal care in Serbian pubic hospitals. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth. 2014; 14:(1)

Nnebue CC, Ebenebe UE, Adinma ED, Iyoke CA, Obionu CN, Ilika AL. Client knowledge, perception and satisfaction with quality of maternal healthcare services at the primary health care level in Nnewi, Nigeria. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice. 2014; 17:(5)594-601 https://doi.org/10.4103/1119-3077.141425

Nwogu E. Utilization of Maternity care. Global Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences. 2009; 15:(3–4) https://doi.org/10.4314/gjpas.v15i3-4.48573

Oladapo O T, Iyaniwura CA, Sule-Odu AO. Quality of antenatal services at the primary care level in southwest Nigeria. Afr J Reprod Health. 2008; 12:71-92

Rahman MM, Ngadan DP, Arif MT. Factors affecting satisfaction on antenatal care services in Sarawak, Malaysia: evidence from a cross-sectional study. Springer Plus. 2016; 5:725-740 https://doi.org/10.1186/s40064-016-2447-3

Regassa N. Antenatal and postnatal care service utilization in southern Ethiopia a population-based study. African Health Sciences. 2011; 11:(3)390-397

Sina OJ. Factors affecting the utilization of antenatal care among pregnant women in LGA of Ekiti State, Nigeria. International Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine. 2016; 1:(1)20-30

Tetui M, Ekirapa EK, Bua J, Mutebi A, Tweheyo R, Waiswa P. Quality of antenatal care services in eastern Uganda: implications for interventions. Pan African Medical Journal. 2012; 13

World Health Organization. Standard for maternal and neonatal care. 2016. https://www.who.int/maternal_child_adolescent/documents/improving-maternal-newborn-care-quality/en/ (accessed 20 March 2020)

Utilisation of antenatal care services as determinants of satisfaction and its challenges in Lagos, Nigeria

02 April 2020
15 min read
Volume 28 · Issue 4

Abstract

Despite the growing interest and efforts by government to popularise antenatal care services in Nigeria as recommended by the World Health Organization, high levels of infant and maternal mortality remains a major public health challenge facing the country. Complications of pregnancy and childbirth cause more deaths and disabilities than any other reproductive health problems in African countries, including Nigeria. Antenatal care presents an opportunity for recognition and appropriate intervention for some of the causes of maternal mortality in developing countries. The study investigates the level of utilisation of antenatal care services as determinants of satisfaction and its challenges among pregnant women in Lagos, Nigeria. A multistage sampling technique was used to determine the sample size of 1 500 pregnant women. A validated questionnaire was used for data collection. The Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficients for the tools ranged from 0.94–0.97. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential (correlation, simple and multiple regression) statistics. The results showed that utilisation of antenatal care services had a significant influence on pregnant women's satisfaction with the services. Long waiting hours in the clinic, income/financial constraints, high cost of services and distance to health centres are the major challenges faced by pregnant women in Lagos.

Complications of pregnancy and childbirth cause more deaths and disabilities than any other reproductive health problems in African countries, including Nigeria (World Health Organization [WHO], 2016). Skilled antenatal care and birth attendance have been advocated globally as the most crucial solution to reduce complications during pregnancy and childbirth. Antenatal care presents an opportunity for recognition and appropriate intervention for some of the causes of maternal mortality in developing countries, especially in rural areas. The maternal mortality rate in Nigeria is among the highest in the world ranked 10 out of 183 countries, between 1999 and 2015 (WHO, 2016). Nigeria is a leading contributor to the maternal death figure in Africa, south of the Sahara, not only because of the size of its population but also because of the high maternal mortality ratio. Nigeria's maternal mortality ratio of 1:100 is higher than the regional average, with an estimated 59 000 annual maternal deaths. Nigeria, which has approximately two percent of the world's population, contributes almost 10% of the world's maternal deaths (Federal Ministry of Health, 2011).

Register now to continue reading

Thank you for visiting British Journal of Midwifery and reading some of our peer-reviewed resources for midwives. To read more, please register today. You’ll enjoy the following great benefits:

What's included

  • Limited access to our clinical or professional articles

  • Unlimited access to the latest news, blogs and video content

  • Monthly email newsletter