Antenatal care

Use of ultrasound in the antenatal space

Obstetrician Ian Donald from Glasgow is credited to have designed and used the first practical ultrasound machine in clinical practice in 1958 (Campbell, 2013) (Figure 1). Since then, rapid progress...

Obesity matters: the skills that strengthen midwifery practice when caring for obese pregnant women

Community midwives who took part in this study are based in various health centres and GP surgeries, and ensure that every woman in every geographical area has access to midwifery services.

SARS-CoV-2: do corticosteroids for fetal lung maturation worsen maternal or fetal outcomes?

The SARS-Cov-2 virus is a virulent pathogen which first emerged in December 2019 in Hubei province of China. This virus is thought to cause severe acute respiratory syndrome and the associated illness...

The NMC Code and its application to the role of the midwife in antenatal care: a student perspective

Midwives are autonomous practitioners who are experts in normal pregnancy and birth (Horton and Astudillo, 2014; NMC, 2015a). Antenatally, midwives care for women in pregnancy from conception to...

A service evaluation of a specialist migrant maternity service from the user's perspective

Migrant women experience poorer maternal and perinatal outcomes compared to settled residents in their host country, including 10 times higher mortality This is driven by language barriers, lack of...

Subsequent childbirth after previous traumatic birth experience: women's choices and evaluations

A sizable minority (10%–20%) of women describe their childbirth as a traumatic experience and have long-lasting negative memories of it Still, many women choose to give birth again Previous research...

Influence of midwife communication on women's understanding of Down syndrome screening information

All pregnant women in England, Wales and Scotland are offered screening for Down syndrome at their first antenatal (booking) appointment with their midwife (UK National Screening Committee [UK NSC],...

Managing women in pregnancy after bariatric surgery: the midwife as the co-ordinator of care

Obesity is graded according to a BMI measurement >35 kg/m2 Morbid obesity is classified as a BMI measurement >40 kg/m2 (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), 2014) It is predicted...

People with learning disabilities accessing maternity services

Public Health England has estimated that 1 087 100 people in England, including 930 400 adults, have a degree of learning difficulty (Public Health England Learning Disabilities Observatory, 2015)...

Cultural qualities and antenatal care for black African women: A literature review

Historically, black African women in the UK have an increased risk of dying in childbirth, compared to other ethnic minority groups, a phenomenon that has been noted since 2000 This has been related...

Gastroschisis: A review of practice

Gastroschisis is an abdominal wall defect in the fetus, affecting as many as 1 in 2000 pregnancies and growing in prevalence worldwide (Lepigeon et al, 2014) It occurs during the first...

Is the introduction of a named midwife for teenagers associated with improved outcomes? A service development project

Teenage mothers are a vulnerable group in maternity services, owing to factors including poor health and social exclusion (Department for Education and Skills, 2006) They often have poorer obstetric...

Are we getting the message across? Women's perceptions of public health messages in pregnancy

The potential for midwives to have a long-term impact on families by engaging purposefully in their public health role has been more clearly recognised in recent years, with publications such as...

Antenatal parenting support for vulnerable women

Social adversity and poor maternal mental health during pregnancy can have long-term adverse effects on children's health, social, educational and economic outcomes (O'Connor et al, 2002; Olivier et...

The acceptability of case-finding questions to identify perinatal depression

Perinatal depression has been defined as encompassing ‘major and minor depressive episodes that occur either during pregnancy or within the first 12 months after delivery’ (Gavin et al, 2005: 1071),...

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