Caesarean section

Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis viewed as a postpartum complication

Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare type of stroke caused by a clot forming in one of the intracranial sinuses and subsequent blockage in blood drainage. Even though venous...

Skin-to-skin contact following caesarean section: a narrative review

Skin-to-skin contact (SSC), the deliberate placement of an infant on the bare chest of its mother, is commonly performed after normal vaginal delivery because of its numerous benefits (Moore et al,...

Maternal and neonatal outcomes for the gentle caesarean section in breech presentation

The gentle caesarean section (GCS) is a woman-centred technique described by Smith et al (2008) as an improvement for the conventional caesarean section (c-section) The GCS aims to optimise several...

Women's decision-making about mode of birth after a previous caesarean section

Despite the World Health Organization ([WHO], 2015) consensus that rate of caesarean section (c-section) should be between 10%–15%, because higher percentages are not associated with a reduction in...

Reducing postpartum infection: How to beat the challenges and take action

The conference ‘Delivering today's babies with tomorrow's techniques: how to reduce postpartum infection’ took place at the Radisson Blu in East Midlands, on 12 and 13 October

Propess versus Prostin: There is an alternative way to induce labour

Induction of labour is a relatively common procedure worldwide, which is used for approximately 20% of pregnancies (NICE 2008) For over 50 years, prostaglandins have been the pharmaceutical method of...

‘Once a caesarean, always a caesarean’? Challenging perceptions around vaginal birth after caesarean

The benefits and safety of vaginal birth after primary caesarean section (VBAC) is a subject of considerable interest to midwives, and one which this journal periodically revisits Some of this...

Readmission following caesarean section: Outcomes for women in an Irish maternity hospital

Clinical audit has been regarded as a valuable asset to examine existing practices with an aim to improve quality of health care in future (Johnston et al, 2000) Rising rates of caesarean section...

Urinary catheterisation: Indications and complications

Increasing numbers of women, either during the birth process or in the postnatal period, require an indwelling urinary catheter for a number of reasons This could be because the woman requires a...

An audit and trial aiming to reduce the rate of surgical site infections for women having a caesarean section

Although birth by caesarean section (CS) is a common procedure, there are a number of potential complications, of which one is surgical site infection (SSI) (Gould, 2007; Wloch et al, 2012) Mortality...

Routine screening of women having caesarean section for MRSA: Ritual or rational?

Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (also known as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA) is a growing problem throughout the world, and although originally associated with...

Do midwives see caesarean section wound care education as a need?

Despite recommendations from the World Health Organization (WHO) that the ideal rate for caesarean sections (CS) should be between 10 and 15%, the CS rate in the UK has not reduced in recent years and...

Placenta praevia: Diagnosis and management

Placental development begins upon implantation of the blastocyst into the maternal endometrium during the initial stages of human embryogenesis Implantation involves localisation to the most optimal...

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